What This Blog Is Not

A plethora of sites inhabit the blogoshpere that purport to teach you how to make the most of your life. They use terms like risk-taking, unconventional life and doing the impossible to motivate you to do more and live better. To steal a quote made famous by the US Army, they try to enable you to "be all you can be."
  
Development For Development's Sake
Just Google the term lifestyle design or personal development and you'll be inundated with information about how to become a better human. You'll learn how to travel the world, live minimally, be location independent, raise an army to your cause and many other such things.


Before I go any further I want to make clear that I have no problem with these sites as far as they go. If they serve to motivate people to realize there is more to life than Netflix and iTunes then that is great. These sites act as giant pep rallies, and rallies have a purpose in life, a good purpose. They get us to move, break us out from our self-imposed lethargy. But rallies generally do not answer the questions, Why? and How?

I can readily find information online about how to run my first marathon, do 100 consecutive push ups or travel around the world with little more than a back pack. But aside from a feeling of personal satisfaction, or greater global awareness, I still do not really know why I should do these things or how they make me intrinsically better than I was before I accomplished them.

What This Blog Is
This has been a long-winded way of saying A Certain Quality of Life will not be one of these sites. I will hopefully inspire people to make more of their lives; that is of course why I am chronicling my own journey here. But more importantly, I think, is that I will be attempting to discover and share why living a fuller life is important to our being human and how living a certain way can help us attain that life. I admit I do not have the answers yet, but I hope a few of you will stick around for the conversation.

By focusing on the classical virtues as the glue holding this site together I hope to draw on the learning and experience of people much wiser than I am. The world has changed so much, and so fast, over the past 100 years, hell, over the past 20! It is easy for us to feel like we need to find the answers to life's biggest questions on our own. But we don't. People have been struggling with how to define what a good life looks like, what happiness is, for literally millennia.

People like Aristotle, Plato, Marcus Aurelius, Thoma Aquinas.

Books like The Bible, Summa Theologica, and The Art of Living.

These sources can give us insight into how people, who dedicated entire lifetimes to study, attempted to answer some of life's most perplexing questions. Through a study of those who have gone before us I hope to get closer to an answer to the Why and How.